Logo of National Eczema Association mobile menu icon
Icon link to National Eczema's Instagram feed. Icon link to National Eczema's YouTube channel. Icon link to National Eczema's Facebook page. Icon link to National Eczema's Twitter feed. Icon link to National Eczema's inspire.com page. Search Icon to search the site

Get the tools and support you need to best manage your eczema

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Managing Eczema on Your Hands and Feet

Although atopic dermatitis (AD) usually improves with age, adults with a history of childhood AD often have persistent eczema on their hands and feet. While lots of people with eczema on their hands and/or feet have come up with their own tricks for keeping it under control, here are a few suggestions that can help.

Managing Eczema on Your Hands and Feet

Why do people with atopic dermatitis get eczema on their hands and feet?

Skin affected by atopic dermatitis (AD) is special in two major ways:

  1. It doesn’t trap moisture as well as it should, so it can’t provide optimal protection against the outside world.
  2. The immune proteins in atopic skin are altered and do not react normally to germs and other materials.

Both of these factors predispose hands and feet in particular to eczema because these sites are more often in contact with more risky stuff than the skin on any other part of the body. The most common culprits are soap, water, sweat, germs, extreme temperatures, rough surfaces and dirt.

What can people with AD do to prevent or treat eczema on their hands?

Avoid excessive exposure to soap and water by following the suggestions below:

If you have a job that requires frequent exposure to wet conditions or lots of hand washing, take extra precautions to protect your hands. Use hand sanitizer more than soap and water to clean your hands. Lathering with soap dissolves the natural skin oils and further dries out fragile skin affected by eczema.

Some ingredients in hand sanitizers can irritate nerve endings (causing the stinging sensation), but do not remove the oils or damage the skin as much as soap. Studies have confirmed that hand sanitizer is less risky than frequent, vigorous washing. However, certain hand sanitizer ingredients, such as fragrance and preservatives can cause skin reactions in some people. It is safest to choose a hand sanitizer that is free of fragrance and alcohols.

Avoid dish soap that claims to “cut grease.” The ingredients in grease-cutting dish soaps can irritate the skin and worsen eczema.

To protect your hands from dish soap, cleaning agents and frequent exposure to water, wear gloves made of vinyl rather than rubber, which can cause allergic reactions in some people. Be aware vinyl gloves hold in sweat, which can irritate the skin and can make eczema worse. To help this problem, buy vinyl gloves that are a little loose; wear white cotton gloves under the vinyl one to wick away moisture; take the gloves off frequently to let your skin breathe and apply moisturizer.

When using soap and water, apply only a small amount of soap to the palms, and avoid soaping and wetting the tops of your hands. Palm skin is thicker and less likely to become irritated. Choose a mild soap that doesn’t contain fragrances or preservatives. Products that do not lather are safest. Carry one of these products with you so you can avoid the very harsh soaps in the dispensers in public restrooms.

Apply a bland moisturizer to your hands as often as possible. Immediately after you wash your hands, at the very least, but 20 times a day is not too often. A thick moisturizing cream or ointment works better than a lotion that can be poured from a bottle. When choosing a product, read the ingredients on the label. Pick one that doesn’t have a long list of ingredients, and doesn’t contain fragrance or lots of preservatives.

Be aware that some people can become allergic to some of the ingredients in moisturizers, so if your eczema is getting worse, switch to plain petroleum jelly or mineral oil. For severe hand or foot eczema try using an additional barrier on top of moisturizer like Vaniply Ointment or plain zinc oxide ointment. Cavilon No Sting Skin Barrier Film, which forms a breathable, transparent coating on the skin, can also be applied directly to skin as an added barrier.

Avoid using topical steroids more than twice a day or for more than a few days in a row. While these medications are soothing, frequent and prolonged use can weaken the skin and make it more susceptible to damage, creating a vicious cycle of worsening when the medication is stopped. Protopic and Elidel don’t cause this problem and can be used for longer periods of time.

If your hands are cracked and bleeding or uncomfortable enough to interfere with sleep, use a “soak-n-smear” technique before bed. There are many variations of this technique. My favorite is: soak your hands in a basin with a gallon of lukewarm water and a teaspoon of added bleach for 5 to 10 minutes. Pat your hands dry, and immediately put on a heavy layer of plain petroleum jelly (read the label and avoid products with names that include “baby,” “lavender,” or “shea butter”). Then put on water-dampened white cotton gloves followed by dry vinyl gloves and wear them overnight to keep the petroleum jelly in place. In the morning, remove the gloves and immediately reapply the petroleum jelly. You may want to put on a pair of dry white cotton gloves to allow you to begin your daily chores without making a greasy mess.

If your hands suddenly become painful, blistered or weepy, see your doctor. A culture for bacteria or herpes virus can help sort out the cause and direct the most appropriate treatment.

Keep in mind that it is possible to become allergic to ingredients in soaps, moisturizers, topical medications, and gloves, even if you’ve been using the same products without problems for years. You may have a contact allergy to one or more of these products if your hands are getting worse even though you following a moisturizing regimen. See your dermatologist about patch testing and allergen avoidance.

What can people with AD do to prevent or treat eczema on their feet?

Irritation from sweat, from socks, and friction is a major cause for foot eczema in people with AD. A moist environment can also predispose feet to infections.

Choose comfortable shoes that are not too tight and are made from materials that allow air flow. Take your shoes off as much as possible. If they have laces, don’t tie them tightly, and untie them when you are not walking.

Socks lined with roughly woven or seamed fabric can be hard on your skin. If you need to wear thick socks for protection under athletic shoes or work boots, wear a thin, smooth sock or sock liner under them. Liners made of polypropylene, Merino wool, silk, or nylon work well. An absorbent outer sock can help wick sweat away from your feet.

If your feet sweat enough to keep your socks damp even when you’re not exercising or doing manual work, you may benefit from a treatment to reduce sweating. Some options are prescription strength antiperspirant, tap water iontophoresis (check www. drionic.com), oral glycopyrrolate pills, and Botox injections. Ask your doctor about the risks and costs of each of these treatments in order to choose the best one for you.

Avoid complex topical products such as antibacterials, antifungals, anti-itch creams or hydrocortisone. You can easily become allergic to ingredients in any or all of these. Furthermore, these products can adhere to the inside of your shoes so that the allergic contact reaction continues even after you stop using them. The safest topical products are those prescribed by your doctor, plain petroleum jelly, or mineral oil.

Avoid using topical steroids more than twice a day or for more than a few days in a row. While these medications are soothing, frequent and prolonged use can weaken the skin and make it more susceptible to damage, creating a vicious cycle of worsening when the medication is stopped. Protopic and Elidel don’t cause this problem and can be used for longer periods of time.

If your feet are cracked and bleeding, follow the instructions for the soak-n-smear technique above, using socks and vinyl wrap instead of gloves.

Topics in this Article

Latest Articles

Related posts